Shown on About Page. Employee/ Lynker culture related articles such as food bank donation, holiday parties and the Lynker flag photo contest.

Lynker’s Observer Holly Naholowaa featured in the NOAA Fisheries Newsletter and Science Blog

Lynker’s Holly Ann Naholowaa was recently featured in the NOAA Fisheries Newsletter and Science Blog for her great work supporting the Observer program.

Great work Holly!

Observations of Fish, Birds, and Life at Sea in the Pacific Islands

February 22, 2019

Pacific Islands observer Holly Naholowaa measuring a lancetfish.

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to work as a fisheries observer? Spending weeks at sea, long hours identifying and measuring fish, and all the while braving the harsh and vast environment that is the open ocean? Holly Ann Naholowaa, a veteran observer for the Hawaiʻi longline fishery, shares her experiences during a fishing trip and provides a glimpse into her life at sea.

Lynker Education and Outreach Specialist Awarded Grand Prize

Lynker employee, Peggy Foreman, was awarded the Grand Prize for her photo entry in the inaugural NOAA Education Photo Contest. See her winning photo below. Congrats Peggy!

6th grade students from Sacred Hearts Academy got first hand experience learning about limu (algae) in their watershed. They learned which species were native and which ones were alien and invasive. However, there is joy and satisfaction when a student wants to confirm that they have correctly identified a species as not to mistake and remove the wrong species. For many of these students, they have eaten limu but this was their first time learning about their role in the ecosystem and why removing the invasive species is critical for the nearshore habitat and barrier reefs that protect their shore and community.

Credit: Malama Maunalua and/or parent chaperone from Sacred Hearts Academy
Submitted by Peggy Foreman (NMFS)

Lynker in Focus: Meet Lauren DeMaio, Scientist

Meet Lauren DeMaio, Lynker’s scientist for the Protected Resources Division within the National Marine Fisheries Service. Lauren serves the NOAA West Coast Regional Office from southern California nine months out of the year and in Seattle, Washington the other three months of the year. Her role includes working for the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program (MMHSRP), where she coordinates rescues and emergency responses to sick, injured, distressed, or dead sea animals for Washington, Oregon, and California.

Lauren’s job also includes quality assurance of the data from stranding events and large whale entanglements throughout the West Coast. With the large amount of stranding occurrences on the West Coast the data can be of considerable size. The large whale entanglement data includes how, where, and what gear is involved in an entanglement and is essential for management and policy decisions. In addition to her love of understanding the data and fixing data nuisances, Lauren’s role is very essential in major conservation actions.

Lauren also enjoys getting out in the field and participating in stranding necropsies or assisting the NOAA science centers in Southern Resident Killer Whale research activities. Lauren recently published a paper titled “The Evaluation of Olfaction in Stranded California Sea Lions (Zalophus califorianus) and Its Relevance to Domoic Acid Toxicosis” in the journal Aquatic Mammals. Lauren’s hard work does not go unnoticed, and Lynker is so happy to have her on our team!