Covering Lynker presence at specific events

Lynker staffs NOAA Booth at Nation’s Largest In-Water Boat Shows

Lynker Employees Joe Linza, Katie Fitzenreiter, and Sam DeBow (L-R) at the 2019 Annapolis Boat Show

Lynker President Joe Linza stopped in to see Lynker employees RADM Sam De Bow (VP) and Katie Fitzenreiter (Oceanographic Data Specialist) who were helping staff the NOAA booth supporting The Office of Coast Survey (OCS) and the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (COOPS) at the October 2019 Annapolis, MD Powerboat and Sailboat Shows.  These are the Nation’s Largest In-Water Boat Shows.  Lynker interacted with the recreational mariner community and answered technical questions about charting and tide products.  High praise was received for the work NOAA does to promote the safety of navigation.

 

 

  

 

There were significant high tides over the weekend and a tropical storm offshore, which pushed water up the Chesapeake Bay, resulting in a lot of people with soggy shoes and wet pant legs asking questions about the tides. The chart below displays the predicted tide (shown in blue) against the measured tides (shown in green).

Data courtesy of NOAA/NOS/COOPS

 

 

Lynker Attends First Annual Nic ECO at Duke!

Lynker HR attended Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment first annual Nic ECO (Explore Career Options) event last week. We met a lot of talented students interested in a career in the environmental field. We identified exciting potential candidates that Lynker is looking for to fill internships and full-time openings in the future.

 

Lynker Receives WBJ’s Fastest Growing Company Award

We are pleased to announce that Lynker is the 45th fastest growing company as recognized on the Washington Business Journal’s 2019 Fast 75 list! President Joe Linza accepted the award.

Joe Linza and Kathy O'Day receive Lynker's Fast 75 award,

U.S. Coral Reef Task Force – Translating Resilience-based Management from Theory to Practice in Hawaii

Lynker is at the forefront of helping local marine coastal managers understand how to apply resilience-building tools to better predict coral reef health, climate change impacts, and bleaching events. These invaluable inputs will enable managers to improve methods for protecting herbivorous fishes through herbivore management areas – and how they could repurpose and/or refine existing management strategies to accommodate long-term resilience building.

Our team led an in-depth assessment of global guidance on coral reef resilience and distilled it into specific recommendations for local managers looking to improve resilience in Hawaii. Working in collaboration with researchers, policy makers, and managers, we helped develop design principles for the strategic placement of a herbivore management area network as a resilience-building tools. We modified existing principles from the design of no-take area networks and then applied the guidance to a case study in the Main Hawaiian Islands. As a final step, we used Hawaii-specific design principles to lead a spatial analysis, which identified specific areas within west Hawaii and Maui Nui where a herbivore management areas could lead to greater resilience.